Guns Don’t Kill People and Other Lies I’ve Been Told…

So, we have another shooting at a High School in Michigan.

And it’s clear we think there is “nothing we can do about it!”

Lies.

When I was pastoring a church I spoke out the Sunday following the the Pulse nightclub atrocity.

I spoke out by having us sing a hymn against murder.

I spoke out having us sing about imagining a world where guns used for killing people…and some guns are meant for hunting (which I’m cool with) and some meant for murder (which I’m not cool with) …was not a thing.

And I got emails.

All the emails.

About how “guns don’t kill people, people kill people,” totally dismissing that people with guns kill people.

It was a total appeal to what philosophers refer to as “plausible deniability.” As if guns designed to kill people are benign.

They are not.

I am all for people having rights. I am all for people who have rights exercising them.

Powder muskets for all who want them!

But guns designed to kill people should not be available to everyone who wants to buy them, Beloved.

I want my babies to go to school without fear of being shot up. They’re already afraid of this viral contagion that too many people refuse to get inoculated against, do we need another factor?!

Apparently so.

What the hell kind of people are we?

The B-Side

Today, November 30th, the church honors an often overshadowed apostle, Saint Andrew. He’s usually called “brother of Peter,” and rarely seen without that qualifier, making him, in essence, known to the world only in relation to his brother…which many people can probably identify with.

St. Andrew is the patron saint of sea-people, but also the informal saint of all who stand in the shadow of someone else.

He is the saint for the B-side of the record, the underdog sibling, the cobbler and the cooper who are no longer appreciated in their crafts.

Lore notes him dying in Greece, crucified because he refused to make sacrifice to the local gods and kept talking about Jesus.

And though he stood in the shadow of his brother his whole life, Andrew gets a place of prominence in the end: his feast day is the official marker for the start of Advent because the First Sunday of Advent every year is the Sunday that falls closest to St. Andrew’s day.